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Still ginger, but not a Wookiee

Having fantasised about it for years, I finally took the plunge and got most of my hair lopped off.

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I’ve had long hair for such a long time it’s just become part of my identity, and I do love long hair, but having held onto it for so long I’d harboured some concerns about going short, even though in my heart it was something I desperately wanted to try.

What if I look like a boy?

It was only once most of my hair had gone, and I could actually see the back of my neck, I actually felt more feminine – I don’t have this endless curtain of hair shrouding most of my face any more, my hair was such a length it covered my shoulders and most of my back. The way I feel about my hair now, I feel as though short hair is a more extreme look, if I wear something feminine I feel more feminine than I did with all the long hair, and if I dress in a more stereotypically masculine way I feel more boyish than I would do with the long hair. I think the way you dress is read more deeply than the length of your hair, perhaps it’s just that attention is taken away from your hair and further onto your clothes or any exposed skin.

Should I cut my hair short?

If you stumbled upon here because you’re considering short hair, I’d advise just looking up short hair styles that you like, I actually bought a women’s hairstyle magazine which basically gives you a huge catalogue of ideas across many different women with different (albeit, still model) faces. This is about having a haircut that you want, so don’t torture yourself looking at pictures of beautiful celebrities with short hair; getting Anne Hathaway’s short haircut will not turn you into Anne Hathaway.

I’ll say this in support of short hair regardless of how it looks, it feels absolutely divine. Two weeks on from my cut and I still can’t stop touching the back of my head and neck, it’s so wonderful, I keep thinking this must be how a dog feels when you scratch behind it’s ears, it’s fantastic. If I tried to put my hands around the back of my neck before, they’d get stuck in a matted ginger mess. When I get out the shower I can towel dry my hair in a few minutes, beforehand I could take over half an hour just trying to dry and brush my hair before I even did anything to try and make it look “nice” (I’ll be honest as time has gone on I’ve made less and less effort in the “nice” hair department, and frequently turned up to work with wet hair).

Is short hair difficult to style?

There’s probably no way I can answer this because effort in styling my hair has and always will be as absolutely minimal as possible – I really cannot be bothered in this department in the slightest. Hair is only as difficult to style as you make it. My hair dresser sorted my pixie cut to look quite smart and neat when I left the salon, and that only took a few minutes of “texturising” hair spray and running her fingers through the hair. So far I tend to put on a little hair spray and just ruffle my hair up, I like it scruffy and this is typically how it looks.

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Short hair has generally made my life easier, getting ready is so much quicker, drying my hair takes almost no time at all, I don’t get it caught in zips, or my glasses, or buttons, or car doors, when I’m sleeping my hair isn’t wrapping itself around my neck every time I turn over, it’s not blowing in my eyes or my face when it’s windy, it doesn’t tickle my arms and make me think there’s a spider there; short hair is so much more practical it’s a joy, and I wish I’d tried it sooner.

Do guys like girls with short hair?

I simply can’t answer this – taste is subjective (and of course, you should probably ask a guy, not me). All I can say is if the entire basis of someone’s attraction to you is based on the length of hair on your head, then a short haircut probably diverts some bad apples away from you if nothing else. Apparently hair grows at about 6 inches a year, so this time next year without any cutting it’ll already be covering my neck again.

On a final note, I sent my hair to the Little Princess Trust, a charity that makes wigs for children who have lost their hair through cancer treatment, it’s a great cause and they provide these wigs at no cost to patients.

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